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Campus Safety& Security

Violence Against Women Act

Introduction

Aims Community College believes that its most valuable resources are the people who teach, learn and work at this institution. It will make every reasonable effort to protect them. The college takes this obligation seriously and will promote and exercise reasonable efforts to reduce the likelihood of accident, or serious injuries through communication, media, flyers, training and education.

On March 7, 2013, President Obama signed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA), which amended the Higher Education Act (HEA), also known as the Jean Clery Disclosure of Campus Safety Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.  Notably, the VAWA amended the Clery Act to now require institutions (colleges) to compile statistics for incidents of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking.   

In response to this requirement, Aims prohibits all criminal offenses, including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. This requirement is for all of our campus locations, leased property, or on academic trips away from Aims property.

Reporting Crimes or other Incidents of Concern

All criminal activity or questionable incidents can be reported in a number of ways, including contact with School Resource Officers, members of the campus security, or anonymously. Anyone can make a report by calling local police, campus security or the Safety and Security office. The contact numbers can be located on the main Campus Safety & Security web page.

Initial Reporting: Call 911 or campus security at one of the following numbers.

Greeley Campus - (970) 539-2171
Windsor - (970) 744-0322
Ft. Lupton - (303) 591-3164
Loveland - (970) 518-5137
Airport - (970) 356-0790

Definitions

Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. (i) The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (ii) For the purposes of this definition dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence. For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic Violence:  A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; by a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected
from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.  For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and § 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Sexual Assault:

Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the
victim.

Crime Definitions From the National, Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS)
User Manual from the FBI’s UCR Program

Sex Offenses

Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his or her age or because of his or her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

.Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. In Colorado, the state statute (18-3-402) covers all the specifics of the Sexual Assault criteria for incidents involving minors and the statutory age of consent. 

Consent

The following definition outlines the specifics regarding consent in the state of Colorado. 
The definition of “consent” in reference to sexual activity per Colorado state statute (C.R.S. 18-3-401(1.5)) under “Unlawful Sexual Behavior.”

Consent means cooperation in act or attitude pursuant to an exercise of free will and with knowledge of the nature of the act. A current or previous relationship shall not be sufficient to constitute consent under the provisions of this part four. Submission under the influence of fear shall not constitute consent. Nothing in this definition shall be construed to affect the admissibility of evidence or the burden of proof in regard to the issue of consent under this part four.

Consent is a voluntary, sober, imaginative, enthusiastic, creative, wanted, informed, mutual, honest and verbal agreement.

An active agreement means consent cannot be coerced, never implied and cannot be assumed, even in the context of a relationship. Just because you are in a relationship does not mean that you have permission to have sex with your partner

Stalking
Stalking means a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her, his or others' safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.    

Some things stalkers do:

(Source: The National Center for Victims of Crime)

Bystander Intervention
Bystanders are people who often witness or learn about a potentially harmful situation and fail to act. “It’s not my place to intervene” or “I don’t know how to intervene” are often the reasons people give for failing to help.  Below are some resources available to help bystanders transform into helpers.

5 Decision-Making Steps

(Source: Step Up! Be a Leader, Make a Difference at (www.stepuppgram.org)

  1. Notice the event.
  2. Interpret the event as a problem — investigate!
  3. Assume personal responsibility.
  4. Know how to help.
  5. Implement the help: Step UP!