Fire Science

Career & Technical Education

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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions for: Career and Technical Education

  1. What is career and technical education?
  2. What is an advisory committee and why are CTE programs required to have them?
  3. What subject areas are covered by career and technical education?
  4. Where is career and technical education offered?
  5. How is it offered?
  6. How many CTE students are there in the United States?
  7. How many post secondary CTE programs are there in the United States?
  8. How is CTE funded?
  9. Is there any proof CTE works?
  10. Do CTE classes transfer?
  11. What is Concurrent Enrollment, and why is it appropriate for CTE students?
  12. Is CTE only for high school students who are not college bound?
  13. How can I learn more about career and technical education?

What is career and technical education?

Career and technical education (CTE) programs prepare students to enter the workforce with the academic and vocational skills needed to compete successfully in the job market. Today’s CTE provides students:
  • academic subject matter taught with relevance to the real world
  • employability skills, from job-related skills to workplace ethics
  • career pathways that link secondary and postsecondary education
  • second-chance education and training
  • education for additional training and degrees, especially related to workplace training, skills upgrades and career advancement


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What is an advisory committee and why are CTE programs required to have them?

Advisory committees are made up of local employers to assist CTE programs in keeping our program content current. The input our committee members provide is essential in ensuring the success of our students in their chosen field of study. Program Advisory Committees are an important part of CTE because the members are currently working in the program area they represent. The expertise of individuals from business and industry plays an integral role in providing high-quality CTE programs, in addition to fostering the development of a trained and educated workforce.

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What subject areas are covered by career and technical education?

CTE covers a variety of challenging fields in diverse subject areas that are constantly evolving due to the changing global economy. View the CTE Programs page for more information.

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Where is career and technical education offered?

In middle schools, high schools, two-year community and technical colleges and other postsecondary institutions.

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How is it offered?

Usually CTE programs are offered as a sequence of courses that are supplemented by work-based experiences, such as internships or apprenticeships.

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How many CTE students are there in the United States?

There are over 15 million secondary and postsecondary CTE students in the United States, according to the latest U.S. Department of Education statistics.

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How many post secondary CTE programs are there in the United States?

About 9,400 postsecondary institutions offer technical programs, including community colleges, technical institutes, skill centers and other public and private two- and four-year colleges.

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How is CTE funded?

Programs receive about $1.3 billion annually from the federal government through the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. That represents about 8-10 percent of budgets for these programs, which receive most of their funding from local and state revenue.

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Is there any proof CTE works?

Yes, according to many studies, CTE graduates are 10-15 percent more likely to be in the labor force, and earn 8-9 percent more than graduates of academic programs, according to a 2001 Russell Sage Foundation study.

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Do CTE classes transfer?

Often CTE classes will transfer to a like program in a similar institution. We strongly recommend that if students are intending to transfer, they consult with the transfer institution to determine transferability of their courses prior to taking classes at Aims. Some CTE programs have state wide articulations in place which allow students to transfer classes within the state to participating 2 and 4 year intuitions. Follow this link for a complete list of Colorado Statewide Articulation Agreements

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What is Concurrent Enrollment, and why is it appropriate for CTE students?

Concurrent enrollment programs are collaborative efforts between high schools and colleges in which high school students (usually juniors and seniors) are permitted to enroll in college courses. These programs provide students with a challenging academic experience and the opportunity to earn college credit prior to high school graduation. Unlike in other programs such as Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate, concurrent enrollment students take actual college courses with a college syllabus, often on a college campus, rather than a college-level course intended to be taken by high school students. According to The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education participation in concurrent enrollment was positively related to enrollment in college. CTE concurrent enrollment participation increased the likelihood of initially enrolling in a four-year institution by 8.6 percent for CTE students. Concurrently enrolled students were statistically significantly more likely to persist in college to a second semester. They also had statistically significantly higher postsecondary grade point averages one year after high school graduation. Of those students ever enrolled in postsecondary education, concurrent enrollment participation was positively associated with their likelihood of remaining enrolled two years after graduating from high school. Concurrent enrollment students’ grade point averages after two years of college were also statistically significantly higher than their non-participating peers.

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Is CTE only for high school students who are not college bound?

No. CTE can provide a foundation of skills that enables high school graduates to be gainfully employed - either full-time or while in college. Nearly two-thirds of all high school graduates of CTE programs enter some form of postsecondary program. Rigorous academic content tied to technical subject matter ensures that these students will be ready for college. The internships and other cooperative work experiences that are a hallmark of CTE are attractive to all students who want to get a head start on a career, whether that career goal is doctor or nurse, automotive technician or computer scientist. Student organizations also help students acquire the employability and leadership skills that will enable them to succeed in the workplace. CTE links high school and community college curricula to help students make a smooth transition to postsecondary education and careers.

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How can I learn more about career and technical education?

Visit the Association for Career & Technical Education website

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