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Criminal JusticeRequirements

Criminal Justice Associate Degree Requirements

Aims offers two degree tracks for the criminal justice associate degree. The degree with designation track is for students who plan to pursue a bachelor’s degree at a participating four-year public Colorado school. The associate of applied science degree track is for students who want to enter the workforce after completing their criminal justice degree.

Associate of Arts (A.A.) Liberal Arts Degree With Designation in Criminal Justice

The coursework for this degree track will prepare you to successfully transfer to a participating four-year Colorado school to complete your bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. Study a core criminal justice curriculum with subjects including:

  • Policing systems
  • Crime scene investigation
  • Judicial function
  • Criminal investigations
  • Criminology
  • Forensic Science

This degree program track has a strong liberal arts emphasis, with course requirements in:

  • Communication
  • Mathematics
  • Arts and humanities
  • Literature and humanities
  • Ways of thinking
  • World languages
  • History
  • Behavioral and social sciences
  • Physical and life sciences
  • Public speaking or interpersonal communications

See requirements for the criminal justice liberal arts associate of arts degree.

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Criminal Justice

Explore the classes that will teach you about the three main facets of the criminal justice system--law enforcement, the judicial system and corrections--and the associated disciplines that connect to it, such as psychology and sociology. 

Gain knowledge and skills in:

  • Criminal law and procedure
  • Constitutional law
  • Law enforcement
  • Criminology
  • Human relations in social conflict
  • Juvenile law

Delve deeper into a specific area of interest in criminal justice by choosing elective course requirements in subjects including:

  • Crime scene investigation
  • Forensic science
  • Delinquent behavior
  • Criminal profiling
  • Forensic anthropology
  • Victimology
  • General and abnormal psychology
  • Sociology

General education requirements round out your learning experience and reinforce the practical soft skills employers want. Study subjects including math, statistics, interpersonal communications, American state and local government, and English composition.

Row Groupings Major Requirements: Credits
required

Introduces students to the basic components of the criminal justice system in the United States. Concepts of crime, crime data, victimization, perspectives and views of crime, theory, and law are discussed. Particular attention to the criminal justice process, interaction and conflict between criminal justice agencies, and current criminal justice issues are examined. This course is a statewide guaranteed transfer course GT-SS3. Three credits.

3
required

Covers constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure, post-conviction treatment, origin, development, philosophy, and constitutional basis of evidence. Focuses on degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility, judicial decisions interpreting individual rights, and an analysis of case studies from arrest through final appeal. Three credits.

3
required

(Formerly titled "Law Enforcement Operations") Examines policing in the United States, including: historical foundations, emerging issues, and the relationship between law enforcement and the community. The various types of law enforcement agencies, their administrative practices, and the behavior of those involved in the delivery of police services are examined from the perspective of democratic values, racial and ethnic diversity, and societal perceptions of police effectiveness. Career requirements, including current and future trends, are also presented. Three credits.

3
required

Provides an overview of the structure and function of the dual American judicial system and the behavior of actors (judges/justices, lawyers, law clerks, interest groups, etc.) within the system. Emphasis is placed on the organization and administration of state and federal courts, criminal court procedures, juries, selection of judges, decision-making behavior of juries, judges and justices, and the implementation and impact of judicial policies. Three credits.

3
required

Examines the history and total correctional process from law enforcement through the administration of justice, probation, prisons, correctional institutions, and parole. Also examines the principles, theories, phenomena and problems of the crime, society, and the criminal justice system from the perspective of criminology and the criminal justice system in general. Emphasizes the role of sociology and other interdisciplinary approaches to the field of corrections and society's response. Three credits.

3
required

Focuses on common law and statutory law crimes, the Model Penal Code, elements defining crimes and penalties, defenses to criminal accusations, and definitions and distinctions between criminal and civil law. Three credits.

3
required

Focuses on the powers of government as they are allocated and defined by the United States Constitution. Includes intensive analysis of United States Supreme Court decisions. Three credits.

3
required

Conduct an in-depth analysis of the socio-legal operation of the Juvenile Justice System emphasizing the substantive and due process rights of minors. Analysis of legal reasoning underlying the juvenile law as it operates all levels of government. Three credits.

3
required

Exploration of the environmental, organizational and socio-psychological dimensions of social control. Includes the study of individual attitudes, beliefs and behavior involved in role conflicts, community relations and conflict management in the social structure. Three credits.

3
required

Provides an introduction to the study of crime, understanding the causes of crime, and examines, theoretical frameworks and theories to explain criminal behavior. Within a social context, consideration is given to how theories have emerged and understand how social context contributes to explanations of crime. Examination of the nature of crime, crime victimization, crime patterns, types of crime, crime statistics, and criminal behavior is also included.Three credits. 

3
required

Provides a demonstrated culmination of learning within a given program of study. Zero to twelve credits.

(3 Credits)
0 to 12
Total Major Credits 33
Row Groupings General Education Requirements: Credits
required

Covers material designed for career and technical students who need to study particular mathematical topics. Topics include measurement, algebra, geometry, statistics, and graphs. These are presented at an introductory level and the emphasis is on applications. This course may be used for the A.A.S. degree only. Course readiness is determined by review of high school transcripts, assessment, and/or meeting with an Aims Academic Advisor. Three credits.

3
required

Introduces descriptive and inferential statistics, with an emphasis on critical thinking and statistical literacy. Topics include methods of data collection, presentation and summarization, introduction to probability concepts and distributions, and statistical inference of one and two populations. This course uses real world data to illustrate applications of a practical nature. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-MA1 category. Course readiness is determined by review of high school transcripts, assessment, and/or meeting with an Aims Academic Advisor. Three credits.

3
Blank Space
required

Combines the basic theory of speech communication with public speech performance skills. Emphasis is on speech delivery, preparation, organization, support, and audience analysis. Three credits.

3
required

Examines the communication involved in interpersonal relationships occurring in family, social and career situations. Relevant concepts include self-concept, perception, listening, nonverbal communication, and conflict.  This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-SS3 category. Three credits.

3
Blank space
required

Emphasizes the planning, writing, and revising of compositions, including the development of critical and logical thinking skills. This course includes a wide variety of compositions that stress analytical, evaluative, and persuasive/argumentative writing. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-CO1 category. May be taken concurrently with CCR 094. Three credits.

3
required

Emphasizes the structure and function of state, county, and municipal governments including their relations with each other and with national government. Includes a study of Colorado government and politics. This course is a statewide guaranteed transfer course GT-SSI. Three credits.

3
required

Explores differences based on race, ethnicity, social class, gender, age, ability status, and sexual identity. Critically examines the dynamics of intergroup relations and how social construction of these differences can lead to patterns of prejudice, discrimination, and inequality nationally and globally. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-SS3 category. Three credits.

3
Total General Education Credits 15
Row Groupings Elective Requirements: Credits
Elective Requirements:

Choose 4 from the list below for a total of 12 credits.

required

Focuses on basic procedures in crime scene management to include photography and preparing initial reports and sketches. Includes processing evidence and related criminalistic procedures. Covers interviewing suspects, witnesses and victims to include the recording of identifications and descriptions. Incorporates lab and lecture. Three credits.

3
required

Exploration of the fundamentals of forensic science that are essential for gathering evidence at the crime scene and analyzing it in the crime laboratory. Three credits.

3
required

Focuses on the adolescent who violates social and legal norms and the consequences for the individual and society. Emphasizes the social and psychological factors influencing individual delinquent patterns. Three credits.

3
required

Demonstrates to the student the role the crime victim plays in the criminal justice system. The traditional response that a crime victim receives from the system will be studied and the psychological, emotional and financial impact these responses have on victimization will be analyzed. Three credits.

3
required

Examines theories of crime causation with respect to crimes committed by the most violent offenders in society, an analysis of the research done, and the history of Criminal Personality Profiling, beginning with the earliest explanations through the beliefs of modern science, as well as psychological and sociological explanations. Identifies various known offenders, examines their backgrounds, and explains how current research into homicide, sexual offenses and serial killers can provide clues to the identity of unknown offenders. Three credits.

3
required

Studies the basic principles of forensic anthropology, an applied field within the discipline of physical anthropology. Includes the study of the human skeleton, practical application of physical anthropology and archaeology, and judicial procedure, as they relate to the identification of human remains within a medico-legal context. Three credits.

3
required

Focuses on the scientific study of behavior including motivation, emotion, physiological psychology, stress and coping, research methods, consciousness, sensation, perception, learning, and memory. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-SS3 category. Three credits.

3
required

Examines abnormal behavior and its classification, causes, treatment, and prevention. This course is a statewide guaranteed transfer course GT-SS3.  Three credits.

Course Prerequisites

PSY 101 or PSY 102 with a grade of "C" or better

3
required

This course examines the basic concepts, theories, and principles of sociology, including topics of culture, race, class, gender, sexuality, social groups, and deviance through a local and global lens. Analyzes and interprets socio-historic as well as contemporary issues by using critical thinking skills and linking individual experiences to social structures. This is a statewide Guaranteed Transfer course in the GT-SS3 category. Three credits.

3
Total Elective Credits 12
Total credits for A.A.S. Degree 60